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Buskers' actions 'too dangerous'

RISKY ACT? These two buskers were seen juggling at a busy road junction on Monday. They waited for the lights to turn red before performing and asking for money from motorists. Police have reportedly taken down their details.


    Apr 23, 2015

    Buskers' actions 'too dangerous'

    T WO buskers without valid permits have been spotted performing at a busy junction, before weaving through traffic asking for money from drivers waiting for the lights to turn green.

    A Lianhe Wanbao reader, who gave his name only as Mr Deng, told the evening daily that he saw a man and a woman at about 5.30pm on Monday at the intersection of Victoria Street and Bras Basah Road.

    They waited for the traffic lights to turn red before beginning their performance on the pavement. Dressed in matching outfits, complete with red clown noses, they tossed juggling balls and clubs to each other, and even switched places while juggling.

    According to Mr Deng, the performance lasted for about 30 seconds. The pair then bowed, walked towards the vehicles that had stopped at the junction and waved their hats vigorously to ask for money.

    Some drivers rolled down their windows to put cash into the hats, but others ignored them.

    Once they were done, the pair returned to the pavement to wait for the lights to turn red again before repeating their routine.

    Worried that there would be an accident, Mr Deng called police.

    He said: "What if the lights suddenly turned green and they had no time to avoid being hit? It's too dangerous."

    According to the paper, police officers arrived at the scene and took down the particulars of the pair before letting them go.

    Mr Deng also said that he has spotted several street performers in the past year, many of whom he suspects may not be licensed.

    A spokesman for the National Arts Council (NAC) told My Paper yesterday that the pair does not have a letter of endorsement under its busking scheme.

    "The busking scheme is open to Singaporeans and permanent residents, as well as foreigners who hold a work permit and have received approval from the Ministry of Manpower," said the spokesman.

    She added that applications for the letter of endorsement can be made on the NAC website. Applicants also have to go through a familiarisation workshop and an audition.

    As of this year, there are more than 200 endorsed buskers. The NAC counsels those who do not adhere to regulations and revokes the letters in serious cases.

    Additionally, buskers can perform only at more than 100 designated locations.

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