Aug 27, 2013

    I'm a fan of Korean cinema

    Israeli director Evgeny Ruman will be here tomorrow to open his critically acclaimed film, Igor And The Cranes' Journey - an adaptation of a popular Israeli children's book - at the 21st Israel Film Festival.

    The 33-year-old speaks to My Paper on why he chose to focus on this tender story of an estranged father and son who are brought together as they trace the migratory journey of a family of birds.

    How did you end up becoming a film-maker?

    When I was 15 or 16, I saw Stanley Kubrick's The Clockwork Orange on TV. It was like nothing I'd seen before.

    That was the moment I discovered my fascination with cinema. Later on, when I was studying in film school, I understood that...every film is a different world, a different life. As a film director, you have an opportunity to create multiple worlds and to live multiple lives, it's like a miracle for me.

    What inspired you to take on Igor And The Cranes' Journey?

    I was born in the then Soviet Union (now Belarus) and emigrated to Israel with my parents when I was 11, just like Igor in the film, who moves at that age from Russia to Israel.

    So many emotional components of our stories are similar, and I felt a strong personal connection to the main protagonist and his journey.

    It is my first feature film, and it was important for me to direct a film about something I have personal experience with.

    Are you familiar with Asian directors and have you been inspired by any?

    Of course. I especially like Korean cinema. It's one of the most interesting and freshest film industries in the world today.

    My favourite Korean director is Joon Ho Bong. His Memories Of Murder is one of the best films I've seen.

    Will this be your first time in Singapore?

    Yes, I'll be here for only four days and I intend to do what I always do when I arrive in a new place - walk around the streets as much as possible to see the local people, and to eat the local food.

    What's your next film about?

    My next film is supposed to be a low-budget drama that takes place in an apartment one night. It's about a person who disappears without any explanation, and his wife tries to understand what happened to him.

    It's called The Man In The Wall. I hope to get financing and to shoot this film soon.


    The Israel Film Festival is on at The Cathay (2 Handy Road) from tomorrow till Tuesday. Visit for the full programme and for ticketing.

    Ruman will hold a discussion at 8.30pm tomorrow, after the 7pm screening of Igor And The Cranes' Journey. Tickets for the screening are $11.