SIA's a great way to fly: Here's why

SIA ICON: In Singapore Airlines' upcoming ad, the Singapore Girl retains her strong presence. But the focus this time seems to be on how the airline goes to great lengths to serve its customers.


    Aug 27, 2013

    SIA's a great way to fly: Here's why

    SINGAPORE Airlines (SIA) has revealed a strategy in its advertising campaign by shining a spotlight on how it goes the distance to bring its customers what they want.

    An ad based on the slogan "The Lengths We Go To" was filmed in various locations worldwide.

    It boasts of how the airline gets its jasmine tea from China, arthouse films from Venice and soft leather seats from Scotland.

    The ad is expected to be released in the coming week.

    A five-minute "Making Of" teaser for the ad was posted on the airline's YouTube channel on Saturday. It shows behind-the-scenes footage and contains running commentaries from stakeholders involved in its production.

    Mr Robin Nayak, the head of strategy at TBWA Singapore, the ad agency behind the campaign, said in the video: "We've recognised that, as times change, the brand needs to evolve with those changes."

    The airline's ads had been produced by Batey Ads for more than 30 years before the account was lost to TBWA in 2007.

    At first glance, the focus of the new campaign appears to have shifted from the Singapore Girl.

    Industry experts My Paper spoke to weighed in on the subtle differences in strategy.

    Mr Hari Ramanathan, regional strategy director of Young & Rubicam Group Asia, said: "Earlier ads focused on the overall feel and service, but now it dives into the specifics - the nitty-gritty on why SIA is better."

    The Asia managing director of aviation publication Flightglobal, Mr Greg Waldron, said that the Singapore Girl still has a strong presence in the ad.

    He said: "It seems to me that (the Singapore Girl) is alive and well. (The ad) continues the trend where the SIA Girl is the main differentiator between (SIA) and other carriers."

    The ad campaign comes after SIA Group's operating profit for the 12 months that ended on March 31 was down by about 20 per cent.

    Last month, some shareholders raised concern over the airline's falling operating profits, The Straits Times reported.

    Mr Mohshin Aziz, an analyst at Kuala Lumpur-based Maybank Investment Bank, said: "(The ad campaign) is a good but futile effort.

    "The market now is more cost-conscious. SIA has to do more to sell itself as an airline of value."